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If Facebook isn’t showing you content you want to see, then find content you want to see and comment on the post. The more you do this the happier you’ll be with your home feed.

Commenting (not just liking) retrains the algorithms for Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and even Instagram. It’s to their benefit to show you content you will interact with. You have to participate. That’s the “social” part of “social media.”

The algorithm doesn't rule us. We rule the algorithm by training it with our behavior. Click To Tweet

You get out of social media what you put into it.

Fighting The Feed

A friend on Facebook said, that Facebook isn’t showing them the right things anymore.

I also hear the same thing from people using LinkedIn. They say LinkedIn is just junk, just sales people. They say the same thing about Twitter. Twitter is just showing you in politics. Instagram is just beauty products. We’ve all heard it.

Social Media Needs Participation

If you don’t like what you see, change it. This is where the power of commenting comes into play.

The more that you comment, the more that social network learns what you like. It’s to their advantage to show you the things that you will interact with.

If you want to have friends, you need to be a friend. This is base psychology. Friendships are more than pressing the like/heart button. Liking is good. Commenting is better.

If you want to have friends, be a friend. This means commenting on other people's posts, not just your own. Click To Tweet

Double tapping doesn’t get you noticed; comments do. This is how we maintain relationships — business, personal, romantic. You have to make the effort.

How You Spend Your Time Online Matters

Think about how you behave online. Take extra time to comment and participate. You can do this in as little as five minutes a day. Be intentional. Block out your time.

You haven’t heard from your long lost friend from high school in awhile? Go to their profile, actually put their name in a search bar, and find something on their profile that you can comment on. Ideally, your comment should be something positive and kind.

On Twitter if you haven’t seen somebody tweet in a while, be proactive. Go to their profile and look for one of their tweets, then reply to it. That’s how you comment on Twitter. You press reply.

If you’re on LinkedIn and you haven’t seen a post from one of your colleagues, go find their profile. Find something they’ve shared. Comment on it.

If you haven’t seen a friend post on “the Gram” in a while, search for their name, find one of their posts, and write more than three words.

The algorithm doesn’t rule us. We rule the algorithm by training it with our behavior.

2 Comments

  1. Mitch Mitchell on September 24, 2020 at 6:13 pm

    I initially thought I’d commented on this article, then realized why I hadn’t. You’re talking about getting engagement on Facebook, Twitter and other social media sites, whereas I work harder at getting people to comes to my blogs, read and hopefully comment. However, since I consider blogging the first social media platform, everything you said here works for blogging in spades. I compared commenting to guest posts and interviews, and commenting on other blogs has always driven more traffic.

    • Bridget Willard on September 24, 2020 at 6:52 pm

      That is an excellent point. I appreciate you taking the time! Thanks, Mitchell.

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