Learning Twitter: Lesson 10 Using Hootsuite with Lists

Learning Twitter can be overwhelming. But, as with any task, breaking it down into smaller parts helps considerably. This is the final lesson of my ten-part series.

In less than five minutes, I show you how to use Hootsuite with your lists. (I use Hootsuite Pro and this is my affiliate link.)

What you need:

  • Twitter Lists
  • Twitter Client

About Twitter Lists

You create and edit lists on Twitter. Think of parallel industries, keywords, geolocation, and/or categories and topics.

Lists can be public or private. The names of your public list are visible and users can subscribe to your public lists.  When you list someone, they are notified of the list you added them to. Be careful how you name them. I recommend using keyword-type names. I don’t use private lists. I have more detail on the how and why of lists in this blog post.

More: Twitter Help Center:  Using Twitter Lists

About Twitter Clients

A Twitter client allows you to do more with Twitter. You can use any kind of Twitter Client like TweetDeck, but I prefer HootsuitePro because the columns you setup are the same on desktop or mobile. Once your lists are created, you can import the feed in a column, to make it easier.

For In-Depth Tutorials See:

Don’t forget to have fun!

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Twitter Lessons: Lesson 9 Twitter Chats

Learning Twitter can be overwhelming. But, as with any task, breaking it down into smaller parts helps considerably. This is lesson nine in a ten-part series.

In less than five minutes, I show you how join a Twitter chat.

Why join a Twitter chat?

Many people start their Twitter accounts and build a small community, interacting as time allows, and that’s great. I’m a huge advocate for Twitter as you can tell by the quantity of posts I’ve written. Your Twitter use can exist without a chat, but the chat is more rewarding.

Small bursts of conversation on Twitter is fun but unfocused. If your time is limited and you want to make a big impact during one hour a week, joining a Twitter chat is the way to go.

Each chat revolves around a topic which makes the interaction both focused and engaging — allowing you to shine as a thought leader. If joining a Twitter chat is Twitter 301, hosting one is Twitter 401. It’s definitely advanced and a bit more complicated. Though, for me, it reminds me of AOL chat rooms in the 90’s.

Twitter chats are exciting because they are live, sometimes the answers are even controversial.

Even better, you discover people who are engaged and active on Twitter. Meeting people is never a bad thing.

How do you find a chat?

You can go to Twubs  to search for hashtags. TweetChat is my favorite chat client.

The easiest way to find a chat, I’ve found, is through one of your trusted followers. Twitter chats are full of friendly and welcoming people.

Buffer has great advice about chats, too. So check that out if you want more depth.

Don’t forget to have fun!

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Learning Twitter: Lesson 8 Composing Content

Learning Twitter can be overwhelming. But, as with any task, breaking it down into smaller parts helps considerably. This is lesson eight in a ten-part series.

In less than five minutes, I show you how to compose content in your tweet. How to tweet is easier said than done you think. Perhaps it’s because you haven’t thought about the things you will write.

What if I have nothing to say?

You may think  you have nothing to say. But I’ll challenge you and say that you absolutely have things to say. This is why you have customers. You started a business because you had skills and a passion. You worked hard to build it up. All of that matters. Your education matters. Your expertise matters.

Tweet out what you're passionate about. Why did you start this business? Let us all know. Click To Tweet

Composing original content and sharing that on Twitter shows off your expertise. Being a thought leader isn’t always about giving a TED Talk; it’s about influencing people around you. Mainly — your customers.

What if I have nothing to tweet?

You have a voice. You have something to say.

Believe me have ideas. You have your own style. You can add value to the world. Are you worried you’ll just state the obvious? Maybe the obvious isn’t that obvious.

“Everybody’s ideas seem obvious to them. Maybe what’s obvious to me is amazing to someone else.” Derek Sivers 

Start an Idea File

Open up a text file, notes on your phone, or a Google Doc the next time you’re on a sales or customer service call.

  • What are some of the phrases you repeat?
  • What are some of the common questions from customers?
  • Are there words that clients don’t understand? Define them in a tweet.

Jot down your notes and put them into 180-260 words. Now, you have a library of tweets.

Send out one a day. And you’re publishing!

Yes, it’s that easy.

I have more tips in my post on content here.

Don’t forget to have fun!

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Learning Twitter: Lesson 7 Responding to Replies and Retweets

Learning Twitter can be overwhelming. But, as with any task, breaking it down into smaller parts helps considerably. This is lesson seven in a ten-part series.

In this four minute video, I talk about engaging (which means being polite and responsive). Replying to tweets and retweeting is a great way to engage your audience.

It seems that a retweet is commonly accepted as a substitute for “thank you” or “you’re welcome.” And this is why the conversation is stopped.

Strategy: Why are you on Twitter?

Strategy determines tactics. If your main purpose on Twitter is to opine and to be known for such, then you’ll really like being retweeted and you can collect those stats like baseball cards, showing them off when your friends and family come to visit. Being retweeted in this scenario is a good thing (for the opiner). However, if you are the person retweeting, you get little to nothing out of your effort.

If your purpose to be on Twitter is to meet new people, then the conversation tactic is the one for you.

When you read a tweet, you have the choice, dare I say power, to reply. You have the ability to make that one person (or group of two) feel more comfortable.

“Twitter is a party that your neighbor’s brother-in-law’s mother is having. You won’t know ANYONE when you get there. How are you going to get through it? Easy. You start jumping in on conversations and learning about others, so you make friends. Talk about what THEY are talking about and, eventually, they will ask about YOU.” Amy Donohue

I have more tips in my post on conversations here.

Don’t forget to have fun!

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Learning Twitter: Lesson 6 Following People Back

Learning Twitter can be overwhelming. But, as with any task, breaking it down into smaller parts helps considerably. This is lesson six of a ten-part series.

In this short video I cover why you should follow people back. Check them out, follow, list. That’s the simple plan.

When I recorded this video, Twitter’s buttons were different. Now the way you add people to a list is with the three dots. Here is a screenshot.

Following people back is the way to be social and to grow your account organically.
Following people back is the way to be social and to grow your account organically.

Why Follow Back? Answer: Following Ratios

It sucks when you don’t realize you can only follow 2000 people and then you hit a following wall, literally. You can’t follow anyone else unless more people follow you. If you followed no one back and are following 2000, you’ve got a lot of work to do, my friend, both to follow and unfollow. If you want to grow, you have to maintain the following to follower ratio.

There are additional glass ceilings that you hit, I (as @gidgey) hit another one at 5,000 and again 9,000. When I was doing @RigginsConst, I found them at 14,000 and 19,000 also.  It seems to me that the sweet spot is about 1:1 but Twitter says it depends on the individual account.

This is why I had to start unfollowing people who don’t follow back.  I really like who.unfollowed.me for this.

This is why I follow people back. The few exceptions are porn, how to get more users people, how to make money on the internet people, #TeamFollowBack (spammy, in my opinion), and eggs.

Like your cholesterol’s HDL versus LDL ratio, it’s important to shoot for a “good ratio.”  Carol Stephen

Only verfied accounts get to be non-follow-back-ers. This behavior can be viewed as arrogant, so proceed with caution. Remember, it’s called social media for a reason.

As Twitter says,

Once you’ve followed 2000 users, there are limits to the number of additional users you can follow: this limit is different for every user and is based on your ratio of followers to following.

  • More Info: Twitter Help Center: FAQ about Following
  • Find someone to follow and follow them.  Do this at least five times.  Look at their list of followers, are any of them interesting to you?
  • Make lists: news, friends, whatever.  When you follow someone, put them on your list.  Read Carol Stephen’s post on why lists are useful:  “Twitter Lists for the Power User “and my post “Organizing Your Twitter Stream – Use Lists.”
  • Make it a regular habit (daily at least) to check your twitter account, thank those who have mentioned you, and follow back within reason.

And don’t forget to have fun.

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