Social Media Super Hero Blog Title by Bridget Willard based on S is for Supersexy Superhero by karla_k, on Flickr" Creative Commons License

It takes more than tights to be a social media hero.

Chatting with a friend recently, I said, “Well, it takes more than tights to be a super hero.”

We both realized, I needed to make this a blog.

You can’t just install Twitter on your iPhone and think you’re an expert. Expertise comes from a whole world of experience. Experience takes time. I realized this after meeting a lot of people whose pay grade is much higher than mine. A WordPress Nerd is not a SEO Nerd is not a Twitter Nerd. I am a Twitter Nerd. But I digress.

What does a superhero need besides a pair of tights?

Superheroes have a mission, a recognizable costume, a song or motto, a sidekick, and superpowers or gadgets.

You need a mission.

What is the point of being online? Are you here for revenge or to save lives? Batman or Superman? Your overall mission on social media will determine your tactics.

Though I don’t necessarily believe you need to write down everything you do and measure it to death, you should have an overall goal. Is it recognition or building a community? Is the end game selling widgets? Do you want to meet people and build friendships?

You need a costume.

I once joked that I was wearing so much spandex under a dress, I should be a superhero. Essentially, the superhero’s costume is his persona. It’s his branding.

The “bat signal” was “just an outline” used on a spotlight. Boy was that ever branding. And the police force in Gotham were thankful for his help. We need a recognizable logo or image. No matter where they saw Superman in the sky, they recognized him. Superman was never mistaken for Ronald McDonald.

Social Media And Chicken Nuggets

IMG_9109.JPGI used to love McDonald’s chicken nuggets. Then Burger King held my heart for a while until Wendy’s came out with theirs.

Surprising even myself, my favorite nuggets are now from Jack in the Box. Boy, have they changed their game!

Now, it’s Jack or Wendy’s. I never eat them at McDonald’s.

(Why are all of my analogies food-related? That’s another post.)

It got me thinking.

One thing you can count on in the digital world is change.

The only way to keep up is to continue to innovate.

I used to adore Firefox and hate Safari. Then Chrome came out and I was in love. Safari got with the program. I don’t even have Firefox anymore.

Tools, browsers, software — it comes and goes. They either evolve or die.

Accepted behavior on platforms, much like any culture, evolves. I mean, people keep using hashtags in their “friends-only” Facebook posts. The purists and I are like the grammar people arguing over the Oxford comma.

A Tale of Two Kingdoms (or: Why Content Creators Shouldn’t Ignore Google Plus)

Those of us who create content (for a business or for our own pleasure) want to make sure it’s read, watched, or listened to. We also want people to find it. Being found on Google depends a lot on our social activity and, especially, Google Plus.
a view from the ground by darwin Bell, on Flickr
a view from the ground by darwin Bell, on Flickr

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…” Just kidding!

In the competing kingdoms in the world of the internet, social media platforms are springing up like mushrooms in a dark and damp forest. Who will save ye fair maiden? Who will slay the dreaded dragon?

Seriously, the resentment toward the Biggest of the Land from its serfs is directed toward Lord Facebook. We love it for convenience (friends and family, looking at photos, secret groups, login key) but we hate its grandiosity, its advertising, and its intelligence. Like a Lord in the age of Robin Hood, we are served by the Master but we are not free.

There is another kingdom that we’ve all scoffed at and, since the wave debacle, we have lost our faith in. He is one of the most lovable and noble big brothers of them all — Google.

Wait. I may have taken this analogy too far.

But seriously, folks.

Those of us who create content (for a business or for our own pleasure) want to make sure it’s read, watched, or listened to. We also want people to find it. Being found on Google depends a lot on our social activity and, especially, Google Plus.